About Denim Jeans at Glance

When you have jeans that can be purchased for as low as 15.99 to over $3,000 you’ve got to wonder whether you’re paying for anything more than a name. Besides different styles, some people may feel that it doesn’t make a lot of difference whom they buy jeans from.

So is there a real difference between cheap and expensive jeans? The short answer is yes. High end jeans often use more expensive processing and stitching methods which help to preserve the fabric and give it the capability of “molding” to your body over time. High quality jeans will also tend to have better selvage which in layman’s terms prevents the thread from unraveling. Other factors that can affect price and quality are the amount of fabric (in ounces) used, and where the cotton is sourced from. Different countries have varying characteristics to their cotton which will produce differences in the end product. On the other hand, some of the most expensive jeans on the market happen to be those that come in raw denim form. That’s because the production methods and attention to details coupled with the long lifespan raw denim has with proper care (and even not so proper care) sets raw denim apart from any of its washed counterparts.

I don’t want to make this more complicated than it needs to be. The reality is that most of us go in the stores and simply choose whatever fits and looks good in the dressing room so long as the price is right. But if you’re looking to invest in a pair of jeans there are some things you should keep in mind:

  • Note that most retailers carry a limited number of high quality jeans from a limited number of brands. That means that in order to get a good sample of varying grades of jeans, you’re gonna have to hunt for them… most likely online. Don’t despair though; you can always reach out and request fabric samples (or just read reviews) before taking that gamble.
  • Understand that sizing and fit will vary depending on the style, company, and whether the fabric is raw or processed. Even if you have a custom pair of jeans made they may feel funny when you first try them on. Don’t forget that the method of processing will determine how long they take to break in, mould, lose shape, fade or otherwise adapt to you.
  • Recognize that although many jeans may look the same in terms of style, they each will have their own unique care regimen to keep them looking good.
  • Decide how much TLC you’re looking to give to your jeans. If you’re the kind of person that washes your whites and dark colors together, you may want to consider whether higher maintenance jeans are for you.